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A WAR COOKERY BOOK FOR 
THE SICK AND WOUNDED 



E VERY NURSE, whether Volunteer 
or Professional, will be called on to 
make or suggest dishes for our In- 
valid Soldiers. This book has been com- 
plied to assist them in providing the 
right sort of nourishment at the right 
moment. Its value cannot be over- 
estimated— Drinks, Soups. Pish, Meat 
and Puddings are all dealt with in detail 
and with simple instructions for Cooking. 
The volume contains the great variety 
and choice of foods which are neces- 
sary for both Invalid and Convalescent 
Patients. Useful and necessary points 
are given on dishing up and serving 
the Meals of the Patients 


Price 6d. Net 


T. WERNER LAURIE, LTD. 

• ESSEX STREET, LONDON 





WORKS BY MAY LITTLE 

(First-class Diploma, late Staff Teacher at the National Society’s 
Training School of Cookery, London) 


A Year’s Dinners 

365 seasonable dinners with instructions for cooking. A handy 
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Cookery Cp-to-Date 

A Practical Handbook of what to Eat, 
and howto Cook it 

This book of over 600 recipes will be found useful to students 
of cookery, as well as to young housekeepers of moderate means. 

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This book cannot fail to be of great practical value to all house- 
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Size 11 by 15, printed in two colours and enveloped. 1 /- net 

Probably this Is the most practical and useful calendar ever issued. 
The greatest of the many perplexing questions which come to all 
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chief meal of the day — the dinner. This calendar removes all these 
perplexities. A dinner is arranged for each day of the year. All 
things as they come in season are brought in. Variety is secured, 
economy is considered and all the worries of selecting a meal 
removed from the housekeeper. 


T. WERNER LAURIE LTD., 8 Essex St., Strand, London 


IMPORTANT NOTICE 


We have just published an important and timely book entitled 
“THE ABC. GUIDE TO THE GREAT WAR,” 
by Edmund B. D’Auvergne, late South African Light Horse 
and author of “The English Castles.” 

The work includes a detailed coloured map of the seat of 
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The essential point about Mr d’Auvergne’s book is that it 
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is invaluable as an aid to the understanding of every daily 
paper, and has the additional advantage of being compiled by 
a literary man who at the same time understands the science 
of war. 

Price 1/- net 


T. WERNER LAURIE LTD. 

Publishers 

8 Essex Street, Strand, London, W.C. 


’S'i'iSO.. 


A WAR COOKERY BOOK 
FOR THE SICK AND 
WOUNDED 


COMPILED FROM THE COOKERY BOOKS BY 

Mrs EDWARDS, Miss MAY LITTLE, 
Etc., Etc. 

BY 

JESSIE M. LAURIE 



LONDON 

T. WERNER LAURIE LTD. 

8 ESSEX STREET, STRAND 


INTRODUCTORY NOTE 


I HAVE compiled this little book as an assistance to 
those women who have nobly given their help in 
nursing our wounded during this war of 1914. I trust 
that it may be useful to those who may be called upon 
to see to their patients’ foods as well as to the dressing 
of their wounds. 

It is well for all those concerned in nursing the sick 
to remember that diet is as an important a factor in 
the recovery of a patient as anything else : and every- 
thing depends upon the patients having the correct 
food and that properly cooked. 

I would like to thank both Mrs Edwards and Miss 
May Little for allowing me to make use of many of the 
receipts from their well-known Cookery Books. 

J. M. L. 


POINTS FOR NURSES 


§ See that the tray, cloth and the napkin are spotlessly clean 
and that the food is nicely arranged on the plate. 

§ Only the freshest and best material should be used and 
served. 

§ In cases of serious illness the doctor’s orders must be kept 
to the letter. 

§ Use very little seasoning without instructions. 

§ Liquid food must be varied as much as possible. 

§ All food should be given in small quantities and served at 
once when cooked. 

§ Where possible, no dish should be served a second time. 

§ All food must be covered when carried from kitchen to sick- 
room. 

§ Never consult a patient about a meal. 

§ Put all medicines out of sight at meal-times and let the 
meals themselves be punctual. 

§ The food must be absolutely hot or cold, as the case may be 
— nothing lukewarm. 

§ Vegetables and fruit should not be given without the 
doctor’s consent. 

§ Steaming is the best method of cooking — fried foods are 
rich, and should be avoided in serious cases. 

§ All cooking utensils must be scrupulously clean. 

§ Oysters are excellent, as they contain a self-digesting 
ferment. Tripe is a good and cheap substitute, as it is 
digested in an hour. 


5 


PROPER PROPORTIONS 


Milk Puddings — 

2 oz. cereals to I pint milk. 

1 oz. semolina to i pint milk. 

Moulds — 

3 oz. whole cereals to i pint milk. 

2 oz. ground cereals to I pint milk. 

Sauces — 

1. Foundation Sauces — 2 oz. butter, 2 oz. flour to I pint liquid. 

2. Thickened Gravies — i oz. butter, x oz. flour to I pint liquid. 

3. Stiff Binding Mixtures (Panada) — 1 oz. butter, 1 oz. flour to 

1 gill liquid. 

Soups — 

1. Stock — 1 lb. bones or bones and meat to 1 quart cold water and 

1 quart over for evaporation. 

2. Thick Soups — 1 oz. flour to I quart soup. 1 oz. sago, rice, etc., 

to 1 quart soup. 

3. Purges — 2 oz. butter and 2 oz. flour to 1 quart pur^e. 

Creams — 

1. Whole Creams — J oz. gelatine to 1 pint cream. 

2. Custard and Fruit Creams — J oz. gelatine to 1 pint cream. 

Jellies — 

2 oz. gelatine to 1 quart liquid. 

Aspic Jelly — 2J oz. gelatine to x quart liquid. 

Increase the proportion in hot weather. 

Custards — 

1. Plain — 2 yolks of eggs and 1 oz. cornflour to 1 pint milk. 

2. Rich — 4 yolks of eggs to £ pint milk. 

Bread — 

1. Fermented — ^ oz. yeast to 1 lb. flour. 1 oz. yeast to 3^ lbs. flour. 

2. Baking Powder Bread (unfermented) — 2 teaspoonfuls baking 

powder to 1 lb. flour. 

Pastry — 

1. Suet Crust — 8 oz. suet to 1 lb. flour (good). 6 oz. suet to 1 lb. 

flour and 1 teaspoonful baking powder (cheaper). 

2. Short Crust — 8 oz. fat to 1 lb. flour. 6 oz. fat to 1 lb. flour and 

1 teaspoonful baking powder. 

3. Flaky — 10 oz. shortening to 1 lb. flour. 

4. Puff Pastry — I lb. shortening to 1 lb. flour. 

Batter — Pancake Batter — 

8 oz. flour, 1 pint milk, 2 eggs. 

More eggs and less milk for richer batter. 


6 


CONTENTS 


Points for Nurses 
Proper Proportions 
Liquid Foods 

1 Arrowroot Gruel 

2 Arrowroot Cup 

3 Barley Gruel 

4, 5 Barley Water 
6, g Beef Tea 
io Benger’s Food 

Bread 

15 Milk Rolls 

16 Quickly-made Bread 

17 Brown Bread 

Cakes . . 

21, 22 Luncheon Cake 
23 Sponge Cake 

Eggs 

26 Egg Milk 
27, 32 Scrambled 

28 Egg Drink 

29 Whipped 

30 Croquettes 

Fish 

37 Boiled Cod 

38 Fish in Milk* 

39 Fish in Batter 

40 Plaice (fried) 

41 Sprats (fried) 

42 Oyster Croquettes' 

43 Fish Souffles 

44, 46 Oysters (scalloped) 
45 Cod (cream of) 

47 Mackerel (boiled) 

Jellies and Junkets 

58 Junket 

59 Milk Jelly 

60 Apple Jelly 

61 Fruit Jelly 

Meat Dishes 

66 Sweetbreads (fried) 

67 Sweetbreads (stewed) 

68 Calf's Head (boiled)' 

69 Veal (minced) 

70 Veal (cream of) 

72 Veal (boiled knuckle) 

71 Sheep’s Head Broth 

7 


PAGE 

5 

6 

9 

1 1 Bread and Milk 

12 Beef Juice 

13 Cornflour Cup 

14 Coffee Milk 
28 Egg Drink 

165-167 Gruel 

12 

18 Vienna Bread 

19 Wholemeal Bread 

20 Breakfast Scones 

14 

24 Cornish Snow Cake 

25 Cornflour Cake 

. . . 16 

31 Poached 
33 Scotch 

34, 35 Eggs (tomato) 

36 Eggs in Cups 

19 

48 Haddock (fried) 

49 Sole (fried) 

50, 51 Fish Cakes 

52 Plaice (baked) 

53 Mackerel (broiled) 

54 Mackerel (filleted) 

55 Fricassee of Fish 

56 Scalloped Fish 

57 Sole Knots 

25 

62 Lemon Jelly 

63 Wine Jelly 

64 Calf’s Foot Jelly 

65 Beef Jelly 1 

. 28 

73 Tripe and Onions 

74 Beef (fillets) 

75 Beef Cutlets' 

76 Beef (minced) 

77 Stewed Steak 

78 Scotch Collops 

79 Boiled Mutton 


8 CONTENTS 


Meat Dishes —continued 

80, 84 Mutton Cutlets 

81 Mutton Shoulder 

82 Mutton Haunch 

83 Mutton Saddle 

Poultry and Game 

87 Pigeons (stewed) 

88 Pigeons (roast) 

89 Fowl (boiled) 

90 Chicken Croquettes 

91 Chicken Fricassee 

92 Partridge (roast) 

Soups 

99 Pearl Barley 
100 Mock Turtle 
iox, 108 Clear Gravy 
102 Oyster 

103, 104 Mutton Broth 
105 Veal Broth 
106, xix Scotch Broth 
107 Vermicelli 

Sweets and Puddings 

1 18 Rice Mould 

1 19 Rice Croquettes 

120, 129 Rice Milk Pudding 

12 1 Semolina 

122 Blancmange 

123 Roly-Poly Jam 

124 Lemon Cream 
125, 146 Omelet (sweet) 

126 Stewed Pears 

127 Apple Snow 

128 Boiled Custard 

130 Sago Pudding 

1 31 Arrowroot Pudding 

132 Ginger Pudding 

Vegetables 

148 Potato Souffles 

149 Potatoes (new) 

150 Potatoes (old) 

15 1 Cauliflowers 

152 Asparagus 

153 Haricot Beans 

154 Brussels Sprouts 

155 Onions (boiled) 

156 Seakale 

Extra Recipes 

Sweet Sauces . 

Drinks . 


PACE 

84 Mutton Cutlets 

85 Calf's Feet 

86 Calf’s Head 


• 35 

93 Pheasant (roast) 

94 Grouse (roast) 

95 Rabbit (boiled) 

96 Rabbit (stewed) 

97 Rabbit (creme of) 

98 Rabbit (quenelles) 

40 

109 Tomato 
no Vegetable Marrow 

1 12 Lentil 

1 13 Pea 

1 14 Haricot 

1 15 Onion 

1 16 Potato 

117 Vegetable 

. 46 

133 Treacle Pudding 

134 Snowballs in Custard 

135 Glazed Apple 

136 Lady Betty 

137 Lemon Sponge 

138 Prune Mould 

139 Lemon Sago 

140 Canary Pudding 

141 Apple Dumplings 
.142 Apple Pudding 

143 Apple Souffle 

144 Apple Charlotte 

145 Bread and Butter 
147 Baked Custard 

54 

157 Celery (braised) 

158 Leeks (boiled) 

159 Turnips (H la creme) 

160 Turnips (mashed) 

161 Peas 

162 Scarlet Runners 

162 French Beans 

163 Spinach 

164 Celery (stewed) 

. 58 

59 

60 


A War Cookery Book for the 
Sick and Wounded 


LIQUID FOODS 

1. Arrowroot Gruel. — i dessertspoonful of arrow- 
root. Mix well with cold water to form a thin paste. 
Add sufficient boiling milk or water to make i cupful. 

Salt, sugar and lemon juice to taste 

2. Arrowroot Cup. — To about i dessertspoonful of 
arrowroot add | pint of cold water, or milk, and i tea- 
spoonful of moist sugar or 2 lumps of loaf. 

The arrowroot must be put into a basin, then add a 
tablespoonful of cold water. Mix well till it is quite 
smooth. Pour on the rest of the milk (or water), and 
stir over the fire until it boils. Boil gently from 7 to 10 
minutes. Sweeten to taste. 

3. Barley Gruel. — To 1 quart of water add 1 oz. of 
pearl barley. Boil until reduced to 1 pint. Strain and 
add 1 glass of port wine. 

The port wine is not necessary unless specially 
ordered by the doctor. Milk can be added instead of 
water if no wine is required. 

4. Barley Water. — Take 2 oz. of pearl barley. 
Thoroughly wash in cold water. Boil in a quart of 
water for 5 minutes. Strain off the water and throw it 

9 


10 LIQUID FOODS 

away. Boil up the barley again in 2 quarts of water 
until it is reduced to 1 quart. Flavour to taste. 

5. Barley Water. — To 1 pint of water add 4 table- 
spoonfuls of pearl barley and boil for 5 minutes. Pour 
off the water. Add a little sugar and 3 pints of water, 
and let it simmer gently until it has thickened. Add 
lemon juice if desired. 

6. Beef Tea. — 1 \ teaspoonfuls of a meat extract, 

1 1 tablespoonfuls of oat flour, water and salt to taste. 
The meat extract must be dissolved in a pint of boiling 
water, the oats mixed into this slowly, as it comes to the 
boil. Stir well and keep boiling for 7 minutes. Strain 
and add salt. 

7. Beef Tea. — Shred the meat finely, removing all 
skin and fat, put into a jar with salt and cover closely, 
let it stand for an hour, then stand the jar in a vessel 
containing water and cook slowly for 3 or 4 hours, 
stirring occasionally. Strain through a coarse strainer, 
keeping back only the larger parts of meat. If not 
required at once remove the fat when cold. 

Note . — The beef tea can be cooked in a jar standing 
in a saucepan of water or in a slow oven. 

1 lb. lean beef, pinch of salt, x pint water 


8. Beef Tea. — Shred the beef, removing all skin and 
fat, stand in a basin and allow it to soak, adding the 
salt, put into a saucepan and bring very slowly to the 
boil, stirring all the time, and pressing the meat to the 
sides of the saucepan. When it is a rich brown, strain 
through a coarse strainer into a cup, remove any fat 
with a piece of kitchen paper and it is ready to serve. 

1 lb. lean beef, pinch of salt, i pint water 


LIQUID FOODS n 

9. Beef Tea.— i lb. of leg of beef, cut very fine. Put 
into a jar and cover with a pint of water, a little salt, a 
clove or two, one or two peppercorns. Stew on the hot 
plate for 3 hours. 

10. Benger’s Food. — Mix the Benger’s to a smooth 
paste in a basin and add | pint of milk that has 
been brought almost to the boil. Stir well until thick 
enough. 

1 tablespoonful Benger’s (J oz.), cold water, 2 oz. 

11. Bread and Milk. — Take a thick slice of fairly 
stale bread. Cut it into tiny squares, and after having 
cut away the crusts put it into an enamel saucepan 
with about § pint of milk ; boil up very slowly. Sugar 
or salt to taste. 

12. Beef Juice. — A small piece of juicy beef, prefer- 
ably from the rump, about 6 oz. Remove all pieces of 
fat. Broil both sides for 1 or 2 minutes very quickly. 
Cut it into strips and squeeze out the juice with a lemon 
squeezer into a warm cup. Serve quickly. 

13. Cornflour Cup'. — Mix the cornflour smoothly 
with a little of the milk, put the rest into a saucepan. 
When boiling pour it on to the cornflour. Boil for a 
minute or two, stirring all the time, add the sugar and 
pour into a breakfast cup. A teaspoonful of good 
brandy may be added if liked. 

2 teaspoonfuls cornflour, £ pint milk, sugar to taste 

14. Coffee Milk. — 1 teaspoonful of coffee to nearly 
a pint of milk. Boil for \ of an hour. Put in a few 
shavings of isinglass. After clearing, let it boil again 
for a few minutes and then place it by the side of the 
fire to clarify. 


BREAD 


15. Milk Rolls. — Mix flour and salt in a basin, rub 
in the butter lightly, add the sugar and baking powder, 
mix with enough milk to form a dough. Turn the 
dough on to a floured board, make into fancy shapes, 
place them on a greased tin, brush over with milk, bake 
in a quick oven for 15 minutes. 

i lb. flour, 1 oz. butter, 1 teaspoonful castor »ugar, i teaspoonful 
baking powder, £ teaspoonful salt, milk to mix 

16. Quickly Made Bread.— S ift the flour into a 
basin, add the salt, mix to a soft dough with water or 
milk, knead lightly on a floured board, form quickly 
into loaves and bake in a hot oven for about half-an-hour. 

1 lb. flour, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder, x teaspoonful salt, water 
or milk to mix 

17. Brown Bread. — Make as for white household 
bread. 

if lb household flour, if lb. whole meal, 1 oz. German yeast, 1 tea- 
spoonful sugar, 1 oz. salt, tepid water (about i£ pints) 

18. Vienna Bread. — Cream the sugar and yeast 
together, warm the milk, add with the beaten egg to the 
yeast. Sift the flour into a basin, add the salt and rub 
in the butter, mix to a light dough with the milk and 
yeast, leave to prove in a warm place from il to 2 
hours. Form the dough into fancy shapes, brush over 
with egg, leave on a greased tin in a warm place for 10 
minutes. Bake in a quick oven for 20 minutes. 

1 lb. Vienna flour, £ oz. yeast, i oz. butter, i egg, i teaspoonful 
sugar, 1 teaspoonful salt, £ pint milk 


12 


BREAD 


13 

19. Wholemeal Bread. — 1 lb. of wholemeal, a tea- 
cupful of sponge. (It takes | oz. of German yeast.) 
Put the sponge into the wholemeal (in a basin large 
enough to make it), a saltspoonful of salt, sufficient 
water or milk to make it into dough. Knead it a 
little, put it back into the basin, cut it across the 
top, cover over with a cloth ; put it into a warm 
place to rise. When risen, knead it a little ; flour a 
baking sheet, make it into 2 loaves. Bake for 1 hour. 

20. Favourite Breakfast Scones. — £ lb. of Cole- 
man’s self-raising flour, 2 oz. of butter, sufficient milk to 
mix them, a little salt. Warm the butter, and pour a 
gill of milk into it. Mix into dough ; roll it out about 
\ inch thick. Cut out with a round cutter, and bake 
20 minutes in a quick oven. Rolls and twists can be 
made from this. 


CAKES 


21. Luncheon Cake.— Rub into i lb. of self-raising 
flour \ lb. of butter or lard, £ lb. of sugar, \ lb. of currants, 
ditto of sultanas, \ lb. of mixed peel, a little mixed 
spice, and a little salt. Break into \ pint of milk 2 eggs. 
Mix the cake nicely with it. Bake in a moderate oven 
about 2 hours. 

22. Another Luncheon Cake. — 1 lb. of flour, 6 oz. 
of lard or butter or dripping, 6 oz. of sugar, 1 table- 
spoonful of golden syrup, 1 teaspoonful of mixed spice, 
ditto of bicarbonate of soda, the rind of a lemon. Rub 
the butter into the flour, then add to \ pint of milk the 
bicarbonate of soda, also 1 egg ; beat these well to- 
gether, mix with the other ingredients, then clean § lb. 
of currants, and cut fine a £ lb. of mixed peel ; add 
these to the other ingredients. Grease and paper a 
cake tin and bake for hours in a moderate oven. 

23. Sponge Cake. — Whisk the eggs and sugar 
together in a warm place for 10 minutes, remove to a 
cooler place and beat for another 10 minutes. Sift the 
flour in very lightly, add the lemon rind, well butter a 
cake tin, sift out twice first with a coating of sugar, then 
a coating of flour, pour in the mixture, tie a border of 
paper round the outside of the tin, bake in a slow oven 
for hours. 

4 eggs, 5 oz. castor sugar, 5 oz. flour, grated rind of i lemon 

24. Cornish Snow Cake. — | lb. of sugar, £ lb. of 
butter, 1 lb. of cornflour, whites of 7 eggs. Beat 

14 


CAKES 


15 

together the sugar and butter, then add gradually the 
cornflour and a little almond flavouring ; whip the 
whites of the eggs to a stiff froth. Butter a sautepan 
and paper it ; put the cake into it. Smooth it over 
with a knife ; sprinkle over the top a few carraway 
comfits and some sifted sugar. Bake in a very slow 
oven about 1 hour. Do not turn the cake out until it is 
cold, as it is so easily broken. Half this quantity 
makes a nice little cake. It is something like meringues. 

25. Cornflour Cake. — Cream the butter and sugar 
well together, add the flour and cornflour and eggs 
alternately, beating well, and lastly the lemon peel and 
baking powder. Pour into a tin lined with buttered 
paper and bake in a moderate oven from \ to f of an 
hour. 

4 oz. cornflour, 2 oz. flour, 2 oz. butter, 4 oz. sugar, 2 eggs, grated 
rind of { lemon, £ teaspoonful baking powder 


EGGS 


26. Egg and Milk. — Boil the milk ; pour it on to the 
well-beaten egg, add the sugar, brandy and nutmeg. 
Serve with a biscuit. 

1 new-laid egg, ii gills milk, 1 teaspoonful sugar, 1 dessertspoonful 
brandy, nutmeg to taste 

27. Scrambled Eggs. — Take a small teacup of milk, 
2 whole eggs, and a teaspoonful of flour. Beat well 
together. Add a little chopped parsley and thyme. 
Put about 2 oz. of butter in a frying-pan, and stir the 
mixture until it thickens, adding a little pepper and 
salt. When done, turn it into a hot dish and serve with 
slices of bacon around. 

28. Egg Drink. — When the egg is broken and the 
speck removed, add a little sugar and beat well with a 
fork, but do not make it too frothy. Heat a teacupful 
of milk and when nearly boiling pour it on to the egg. 
A little sherry may be added. 

29. Whipped Egg. — Whip the white of an egg, add 
a teaspoonful , of whipped cream, ditto castor sugar, and 
if preferred a tablespoonful of whisky. Mix together 
lightly in a tumbler. 

30. Egg Croquettes. — Chop the hard-boiled eggs, 
make a panada with the butter, flour and milk, add the 
eggs, season with salt and pepper, mix well, place on a 
wet plate, divide into equal portions, set aside to cool, 
form into cork shapes, coat with egg and bread crumbs, 

16 


EGGS 17 

fry a golden brown in hot fat. Serve on a hot dish on a 
fancy paper, garnish with fried parsley. 

3 hard-boiled eggs, 1 oz. butter, 1 oz. flour, 1 gill milk, salt and 
pepper, egg and bread crumbs 

(Enough to make eight croquettes) 

31. Poached Eggs. — 'Break the eggs one at a time 
in a cup, pour gently into a shallow saucepan or frying- 
pan of boiling water with a little salt, cook very gently. 
When just set take out the eggs, place them on a round 
of buttered toast, trimming them so that they are the 
same size as the toast. Serve immediately. 

2 or 3 eggs, salt, buttered toast 

32. Scrambled Eggs. — Put the butter into a sauce- 
pan, well beat the eggs, season with salt and pepper, 
add the chopped parsley and cream or milk. When the 
butter has melted pour in the eggs, stir over the fire 
until the mixture begins to thicken. Put it on to the 
hot buttered toast and serve at once. 

3 eggs, i oz. butter, little chopped parsley, little milk or cream, 
salt and pepper, buttered toast 

(Enough for two people ) 

33. Scotch Eggs. — Hard boil the eggs, put them in 
cold water for a few minutes, remove the shells, dry 
them well with flour, coat with sausage meat, then with 
egg and bread crumbs, rolling them into a nice shape ; 
fry well in hot fat, allowing time for the sausage meat to 
be well cooked, cut off a little of each end of the egg. 

2 eggs, i lb. sausage meat, 1 or 2 tomatoes, salt and pepper, egg 
and bread crumbs, crofitons of bread 

(Enough for four people) 

34. Eggs Baked in Tomatoes.— Choose rather large 
tomatoes of equal size, cut a piece off the top of the 
tomatoes, scoop out the pulp carefully, sprinkle on a 

B 


i8 


EGGS 


little salt and pepper, break an egg into a cup and pour 
it into the hollow of the tomato, place on a greased 
baking tin and cook slowly until the egg is set, basting 
with a little butter. Serve on rounds of buttered toast 
with a little parsley sprinkled over the top of each. 

3 or 4 eggs, 3 or 4 tomatoes, butter, chopped parsley, salt and 
pepper, buttered toast. 

{Enough for three or four people ) 

35. Tomato Eggs. — Put 2 oz. of butter into a sauce- 
pan ; fry in it a little chopped onion and parsley, and 
the grated rind of a lemon. Break 2 eggs in, add a 
dessertspoonful of tomato sauce, and a dessertspoonful 
of bread crumbs ; stir over the fire until it thickens. 
Spread it on toast, cut up in any shape. Dish up on a 
hot dish. 

36. Eggs in Cups. — Butter 2 large souffle cases, 
break an egg in each, sprinkle a little pepper and salt 
over the top and a little parsley chopped, then put a 
teaspoonful of cream on the top. Bake in a very quick 
oven for 5 or 7 minutes, and serve quickly. 


FISH 


37. Boiled Cod. — Well wash the fish in salt and 
water, place it in hot water with a little vinegar or 
lemon juice and salt, simmer very slowly until cooked, 
skimming occasionally, and allowing 10 minutes to the 
pound and 10 minutes over. Drain well ; serve on a 
hot dish and folded serviette, garnish with cut lemon 
and parsley and serve with oyster, anchovy or any 
suitable sauce. 

4 lb. cod, salt, vinegar or little lemon juice, lemon and parsley 
( Enough for eight people) 

38. Fish in Milk. — Butter a pie-dish, place in a 
whiting (skinned) or any white fish, cover with milk and 
bake in a slow oven till the flesh will leave the bones. 
Place the fish on a hot dish, thicken the milk with a 
little flour, cook it thoroughly, add salt and pepper, 
pour over the fish and serve. 

Fish (whiting, sole or any white fish), butter, little flour, salt and 
pepper, milk 

39. Fish Fried in Batter.— Wash and dry the 
fillets in flour, place the flour in a basin, add salt, add 
the oil, then mix smoothly with the tepid water ; beat 
it well, and if possible stand aside for some time ; just 
before using add the beaten white of egg. Dip in 
each fillet, fry them in deep fat without using a basket. 
Drain well, garnish with fried parsley. 

Fillets of whiting or plaice, 2 oz. flour, 1 tablespoonful oil or dissolved 
butter, 2 tablespoonfuls tepid water, white of 1 egg, salt and pepper 
(Enough for five or six people) 


19 


20 FISH 

40.. Fried Fillets of Plaice.— Wash and thor- 
oughly dry the fillets, dip them in flour seasoned with 
salt and pepper, beat up the egg, dip in the fillets, drain 
and roll them in the crumbs, shaking off any loose ones, 
fry a golden brown in hot fat, drain well, and serve 
garnished with lemon and parsley. 

Fillets of plaice, a little flour, salt and pepper, egg and bread 
crumbs 

{Enough for three or four people) 

41. Fried Sprats. — Wipe the sprats in a cloth and 
roll them well in flour in which a little pepper and salt 
has been mixed and a few bread crumbs. When well 
rolled in this, fry them in hot lard, and dish them up 
with fried parsley. Send brown bread and butter and 
a lemon to table with them. 

42. Oyster Croquettes— Blanch and beard the 
oysters. Save the liquor in which they were blanched. 
Cut them in halves ; take 2 oz. of butter, 2 oz. of flour, 
a bay leaf, and a little salt and pepper. Stir over the 
fire for 5 minutes, then add the liquor and sufficient milk 
to make it to a stiff paste ; boil it over a slow fire, 
stirring all the time for 3 minutes. Add the oysters 
lightly, not breaking them, then spread out on a plate 
to cool. When cold, this mixture should be quite stiff. 
Have ready some puff paste, which should be rolled out 
in long strips about 3 inches wide. Put a spoonful of 
the mixture for each croquette, all down the paste, 
leaving a little space between each, then egg the paste 
and turn it over ; cut it in a half-round. Any kind of 
fish croquette can be made this way. Egg and bread 
crumb them (or vermicelli can be used) ; fry in hot 
lard a nice golden brown ; dish up in a napkin, decorated 
with fried parsley. Serve hot. 


FISH 


21 


43. Cold Fish Souffles. — For 6 small souffle cases 
take £ lb. of any kind of white fish which has been left. 
Free it from skin and bones, add a tablespoonful of 
bread crumbs, a small teacupful of milk, the yolks of 
2 eggs, and pepper and salt. Stir well together with a 
wooden spoon ; whip the whites to a stiff froth, and add 
to the mixture lightly. Bake in a moderate oven for 
20 minutes. Dish up on a dish paper and serve hot. 

44. Scalloped Oysters. — Take 2 oz. of butter, 
2 oz. of flour, a little salt and pepper, and sufficient milk 
to make it into a thick sauce. Take a dozen sauce 
oysters, beard them, cut them into halves, and add to 
the sauce 2 or 3 drops of lemon juice ; butter the 
scallop shells, sprinkle them over with bread crumbs, 
fill the shells with the mixture, and then sprinkle brown 
bread crumbs over the top. Bake in a moderate oven 
for 5 or 10 minutes. Serve hot. 

45. Cream of Cod (Hot).— Take 2 lb. of the tail of 
cod ; take the fish from the bone and pound it into a 
mortar with $ pint of bechamel sauce and 2 oz. of bread 
crumbs and 1 egg. Pass it through a wire sieve, then 
add the whites of 2 eggs whipped to a stiff froth ; add 
a teacupful of whipped cream. Mix all these ingredients 
well together before putting in the whites of eggs. Have 
ready a well-buttered mould, and mix the whites 
slowly ; place the mixture in the mould and steam for 
£ hour. When done, turn out on a dish and serve with 
cardinal sauce, or Hollandaise sauce. 

46. Scalloped Oysters. — Open the oysters, wash 
them in their own liquor, put them in a white-lined 
saucepan, strain the liquor over them, slowly heat but 
do not let them boil, take them out and remove their 


22 FISH 

beards, make the white sauce hot, put in the oysters, 
strain in the liquor, stand at the side of the fire for a few 
minutes. Butter some scallop shells, put some of the 
mixture in each, dividing the oysters equally, sprinkle 
over the bread crumbs, put on some small pieces of 
butter ; bake in a moderate oven and serve hot. 

2 doz. oysters, \ pint white sauce, i oz. butter, bread crumbs 
[Enough for six or seven people) 

47. Boiled Mackerel.— Clean the mackerel. Let 
them lie in salt and water for an hour. Put them in a 
fish kettle with sufficient cold water to nearly cover 
them, also a handful of salt and a teacupful of vinegar. 
Bring to the boil, then let them simmer a few minutes 
until done ; drain well. Dish them on a napkin, serve 
hot with fennel or brown caper sauce. 

48. Fried Fillets of Haddock. — Fillet a haddock, 
cut it into small fillets, and sprinkle pepper and salt 
over it, and dip it in egg and bread crumbs ; fry in hot 
lard, drain the fish, and dish up on a napkin with fried 
parsley, anchovy, or cardinal sauce. 

49. Fried Fillets of Sole or Plaice. — Fillet 2 nice 
soles, not too large, and double the fillets, flour them 
over, dip them in egg in which has been put a little salt 
and pepper, then into bread crumbs ; fry a nice golden 
colour. When drained from fat, dish them on a 
napkin. Serve with fried parsley around and maitre 
d’hotel butter. Lift the sole and place a pat of the 
butter in. 

50. Fish Cakes. — Remove all bones and skin, flake 
the fish finely, mash the potatoes, mix them together, 
add the butter and flavourings, form in small cakes, 


FISH 23 

using a little flour ; coat with egg and bread crumbs, 
fry in hot fat, garnish with fried parsley. 

£ lb. each of cold fish and potatoes, 1 teaspoonful anchovy, £ tea- 
spoonful chopped parsley, little butter, salt and pepper, egg and 
bread crumbs 

[Enough for ten or twelve cakes) 

51. An Economical Fish Cake. — Any cold fish and 
cold potatoes, margarine, salt, pepper and white sauce 
if any be to hand. Take all bones away from the fish, 
mash the potatoes, then mix the fish and potatoes 
together in a basin, adding a small piece of margarine, 
the sauce, pepper and salt. Coat the cakes with egg 
and bread crumbs, and fry in boiling fat. If there be 
no sauce add a little flour and milk. 

52. Baked Fillets of Plaice. — Fillet the plaice, 
skin the fillets, if large cut in half lengthways, roll up, 
place on a greased tin, squeeze over each a little lemon 
juice and bake slowly for 15 to 20 minutes, dish on a hot 
dish, make a sauce with the butter, flour and milk, coat 
the fillets with it, garnish with coraline, pepper and 
chopped parsley. 

1 plaice, £ oz. butter, £ oz. flour, 1 gill milk, little lemon juice, salt 
and pepper, chopped parsley 

[Enough for three or four people) 

53. Broiled Mackerel. — Split the mackerel down 
the centre, brush it over with salad oil, or hot dripping, 
season with pepper and salt, boil over a clear fire for 
10 minutes. When done, dish it up on a hot dish and 
put on a pat or two of mattre d’hbtel butter down the 
centre. Serve hot. 

54. Fillets of Mackerel. — Fillet the mackerel and 
cut each fillet into 2 pieces nicely shaped. Put them in 
the oven with a tiny piece of butter on each and a little 


24 FISH 

pepper and salt. Bake for io minutes. Dish up on 
mashed potato, and pour over caper sauce. 

55. Fricassee of Fish. — Remove skin and bones 
from fish and roughly flake it, make a white sauce with 
butter, flour, milk and cream, season well and add 
lemon juice, make a border of mashed potato, using a 
rose tube and forcing bag, place the mixture in the 
centre, garnish with lemon and parsley. Another 
suitable garnish is the flaked yolk of hard-boiled egg. 

1 lb. cold cooked fish, 1 oz. butter, 1 oz. flour, 1 gill milk, 1 gill 
cream, lemon juice, salt and pepper, mashed potatoes 
( Enough for four or five people) 

56. Scalloped Fish. — Remove skin and bones from 
fish and flake it, make a white sauce and flavour it 
nicely, add it to the fish, butter some scallop shells, put 
in some of the mixture, sprinkle over some bread crumbs, 
put small pieces of butter on the top, bake till a nice 
brown in a quick oven ; a little grated cheese can be 
sprinkled over before baking if liked. 

Any cold fish, little butter, few bread crumbs. 

For Sauce 

1 oz. butter, $ pint milk, x oz. flour, salt and pepper. 

57. Sole Knots. — Skin and fillet a sole, cut each 
fillet in half lengthways, tie each piece in a knot, dip in 
seasoned flour, coat with egg and bread crumbs, fry a 
golden brown in hot fat, drain on paper, dish on fancy 
paper and garnish with fried parsley. Serve with 
tomato or any suitable sauce. 

1 sole, flour, pepper and salt, egg and bread crumbs, parsley 
(Enough for four people) 


JELLIES AND JUNKETS 

58. Junket. — Warm the milk, add the sugar, brandy 
and pinch of cinnamon, mix in the rennet and pour into 
a glass dish or into custard cups. Leave until cold, 
pour a little cream on top and grate with nutmeg. 

i pint milk, 1 teaspoonful rennet, 2 teaspoonfuls brandy, 2 tea- 
spoonfuls sugar, little cream, nutmeg and cinnamon 


59. Milk Jelly. — Place the milk, sugar and gelatine 
in a white-lined saucepan, stir over the fire until the 
sugar and gelatine are dissolved, taking care the milk 
does not boil. When cool add the brandy, pour into a 
wetted mould and turn out when set. Stewed fruit or 
jam may be served with it. 

1 pint new milk, 1 oz. sugar, J oz. gelatine, 1 tablespoonful brandy 


60. Apple Jelly.— Peel, core and slice the apples, 
put them in a stewpan with water, sugar, lemon rind 
and juice, simmer gently until the apples are tender. 
Remove the lemon peel and rub the apples through a 
hair sieve, dissolve the gelatine in a little water, strain 
it into the apple pur£e, colour a nice pink with a few 
drops of carmine, pour into a wet border mould, turn 
out when set on to a glass dish. Whip, sweeten and 
flavour the cream, and fill the centre, sprinkle with 
chopped pistachio nuts. 

2lpJnn apple9, * pl . nt water > 8 oz ' loaf sugar, rind and juice of 
cream ’ 1 ° Z ’ gC &t ne ’ feW P lstachio nuts, carmine colouring, 4 pint 

{Enough for six or seven people) 

61. Fruit Jelly.— Prepare the fruit very carefully, 


26 JELLIES AND JUNKETS 

cut the bananas into slices, the oranges into quarters, 
removing the pips, cut the apples into fancy shapes and 
take out the seeds from the grapes. Decorate the 
bottom of a quart mould with cherries and chopped 
pistachio nuts, set it on ice with a little lemon jelly, 
arrange the fruit in layers, setting them with jelly, 
adding a little colouring getting darker each time, and 
allowing each layer to get firm before adding the next. 
Fill the mould quite full. 

Note . — The lemon jelly for this must be made with 
more gelatine in proportion to support the fruit. 

Fresh fruit such as strawberries, apricots, raspberries 
can be used. 

i quart lemon jelly, bananas, grapes, oranges, apples, glace 
cherries, pistachio nuts, carmine colouring 

( Enough for eight or ten people ) 


62. Lemon Jelly. — Peel the lemons very thinly, 
squeeze out the juice and add to the water with sugar, 
cloves, cinnamon and gelatine, making barely a quart 
of liquid altogether. When the gelatine is dissolved 
add the slightly beaten whites and crushed shells, whisk 
well until boiling-point is reached, let it boil five or six 
minutes, move aside till the scum cracks, strain through 
a scalded cloth, add the sherry. If it does not run 
through clear at first pour it gently through the cloth 
a second time. When cool pour into a wet mould. 

Note . — A loosely woven teacloth is the best kind. 

6 lemons, 2 oz. gelatine, i£ pints water, 3 or 4 cloves, stick of 
cinnamon, 8 oz. loaf sugar, 2 tablespoonfuls sherry, whites and shells 
of 2 eggs 

{Enough to fill 1 4 pint mould) 

63. Wine Jelly. — 3 oz. of white-leaf gelatine (in 
winter 1 or 2 oz. of gelatine is enough), 3 lemons, 
2 laurel leaves, a few cloves, J lb. of loaf sugar 


JELLIES AND JUNKETS 27 

and the whites of 3 eggs, with 1 quart of cold water. 
Place the ingredients in a bright stewpan and whisk 
over the fire until it comes to the boil. (The lemons 
should be peeled and the juice squeezed therefrom and 
added to the ingredients before placing on the fire.) 
Allow it to simmer for 5 minutes, and then stand it off 
the fire for 5 minutes. Strain through a jelly bag and 
flavour with maraschino or sherry, rum, brandy or port. 
Name the jelly after the wine or liquor used. 

64. Calf’s Foot Jelly. — 2 calf’s feet and 2 quarts 
of cold water. Simmer for 6 hours, strain into a clean 
basin and stand all night. Take off all fat, add to it 
the juice of 4 lemons and the rinds thinly cut, 6 oz. of 
sugar, also an oz. of gelatine. Stir over a fire until it 
boils, then allow it to simmer for 5 minutes — stand it 
off the fire for 5 minutes and pour through a jelly bag. 
This may be flavoured with any kind of wine ; and it 
can also be made from cowheel, which is less expensive. 

65. Beef Jelly.— 2 lb. of shin of beef, 1 quart of 
water. Cut the beef into squares, place it in an earthen- 
ware pan, put in 3 cloves, 1 bay leaf, and a little salt, 
with a very little browning. Cover the jar and let it 
come to the boil near the fire, then let it simmer on the 
hot plate all day ; strain it, and put it away for use. 
This is nice cold or hot. If taken hot, it should be 
diluted with a little water ; and if it wastes in boiling, 
a little more water should be added. This is almost as 
good as Brand’s Extract. 


MEAT DISHES 


66. Fried Sweetbreads.— Soak the sweetbreads in 
salted water, put on in cold water and bring it to the 
boil, throw it away, put on again with fresh water and 
simmer gently for an hour, drain and press between 
2 plates with a weight on top. When firm dip in seasoned 
flour, brush over with egg, coat with a mixture of 
parsley, ham and lemon peel, then again with egg and 
crumbs, fry a golden brown in hot fat, dish on hot dish 
with fancy paper, garnish with fried parsley. The 
sweetbreads can be cut in slices if preferred. 

2 calf’s sweetbreads, i teaspoonful chopped parsley, little grated 
lemon peel, i dessertspoonful chopped ham, salt and pepper, egg and 
bread crumbs, little flour 

(. Enough for three or four people) 

67. Stewed Sweetbreads. — Soak the sweetbreads in 
salted water, put them in a stewpan with cold water, 
bring to the boil, throw it away, put the sweetbreads 
on again with the milk, onion and mace, and simmer 
very gently till tender ; drain them, press them between 
2 plates and trim them when firm, make a sauce with 
the butter, flour and milk the sweetbreads were cooked 
in, add a little cream, season well, reheat the sweet- 
breads and serve garnished with cut lemon and parsley. 

Calf's or sheep's sweetbreads, 1 shallot or onion, blade of mace, 
i pint milk, 1 oz. butter, 1 oz. flour, little cream, salt and pepper 
( Enough for three or four people ) 

68. Calf’s Head (Boiled).— Thoroughly wash the 
head, let it soak in cold water. Put it in a saucepan 
with enough cold water to cover. When it boils add a 

28 


MEAT DISHES 29 

little salt and remove the scum as it rises, add the 
vegetables, herbs and peppercorns, simmer gently from 
2 to 3 hours till perfectly tender. The brains must be 
removed and soaked, then tied in muslin and boiled. 
Take out the head, remove all the bones, and the tongue, 
place the head on a hot dish, coat well with parsley 
sauce, garnish with the skinned and sliced tongue, 
chopped brains, bacon fried and cut into dice, quarters 
of lemon and parsley. 

Another method is to coat the head (boiled and pre- 
pared in (the same way) with egg sauce, garnished with 
ham, brains, lemon and parsley, or coat the head and 
tongue with brown sauce garnished. 

Half a calf’s head or a whole one, bacon, lemon, vegetables and 
herbs to flavour, peppercorns, parsley sauce, salt 
(, Enough for seven or eight people) 

69. Minced Veal. — Take 1 lb. of cooked veal, mince 
it fine, add to it a tablespoonful of flour and sufficient 
stock to make it a nice thick sauce ; add the veal to it, 
and squeeze the juice of \ lemon ; add a bay leaf or two, 
and stir into the mince. Let it stand on a slow fire for 
I hour, dish up with fried bread around, and serve. 

70. Cream of Veal. — 1 lb. of veal cutlet and 1 pint 
of cream ; whip just a little and pass the veal through 
a mincing machine, then through a very fine wire sieve. 
Mix the cream well with the veal, season nicely, add a 
teaspoonful of chopped truffles in small leaf shapes, butter 
and decorate a plain dariole mould nicely, and put the 
cream into it. Put over the top a buttered paper, place 
in a stewpan, steam for 20 minutes over a very slow fire 
or the cream will be spoiled. When done, turn it out 
on a silver dish and serve Portuguese or Hollandaise 
sauce around, and green peas in the centre. Rabbit and 
chicken can also be done this way. 


30 MEAT DISHES 

7 1- Sheep’s Head and Broth. — Thoroughly cleanse 
the head, take out the splinters, wash in salt and water, 
put the head in cold water and bring to the boil, pour 
away the water, add fresh water and boil, removing 
the scum, cut up the vegetables and add with the rice, 
simmer gently for 3 hours or till the meat will leave the 
bones. Put the brains into a small piece of muslin and 
drop into the stewpan about 15 minutes before the head 
is done. Cut the meat from the head, place in the 
centre of a hot dish, put a border of rice and vegetables 
round, slice the tongue and chop the brains, make a 
sauce with the butter, flour and milk, adding some of 
the liquor ; season well and add chopped parsley. 
Coat the head with this sauce and garnish with sliced 
tongue and chopped brains. 

1 sheep’s head, 2 carrots, 2 turnips, 1 onion, 1 oz. flour, 1 oz. butter, 
1 gill milk, 3 oz. rice, chopped parsley, salt and pepper 
{Enough for five or six people ) 


72. Boiled Knuckle of Veal.— Take a knuckle of 
veal and boil it for i| hours with a little onion, turnip, 
carrot and a bay leaf or two — cook it for i| hours. 
When done, make a good parsley and butter sauce and 
pour over the veal. Boiled bacon should be sent to 
table with it. 

73. Tripe and Onions. — Wash the tripe, place it in 
a stewpan, cover with cold water and bring to the boil, 
put it on a board, scrape it if necessary, cut into neat 
pieces, return it to the pan with about £ pint of water 
and the onions finely chopped, simmer till the tiipe is 
tender, mix the flour smoothly with the milk, add it, 
stir till it boils, season well and serve. 

1 lb. tripe, 2 onions, 1 oz. flour, i pint milk, salt and pepper 
(Enough for four people ) 


MEAT DISHES 31 

74. Fillets of Beef. — Cut some nice round fillets 
of beef, allowing a fillet for each person ; fry them 
quickly a nice brown on each side — glaze with a nice 
rich glaze of brown sauce ; dish them up on a border of 
potato and pour some clear brown sauce around. Serve 
very hot. 

75. Beef Cutlets. — Take a pound of rump steak, 
pass it through a mincing machine twice and add 
2 oz. of bread soaked in \ teacupful of milk — mix this 
with the beef, a little onion, thyme and parsley chopped 
fine, a little salt. Mix well together, form it into cutlets, 
and fry gently in a little fat. When done, dish up on 
a border of potato, put green peas in the centre and 
tomato sauce around. Serve very hot. 

76. Minced Beef. — Take about 1 lb. of cooked beef ; 
add a spoonful of cornflour, an onion, a little bunch of 
savoury herbs, pepper and salt, sufficient stock to mix 
it. Stir it over the fire until it boils, and 5 minutes 
after ; add a teaspoonful of curry powder (which greatly 
improves it). Dish the mince up with fried bread 
around on toast. 

77. Stewed Steak.— Wipe and trim the steak, chop 
the onion, melt the butter in a saucepan, brown the 
steak, remove it and brown the onion, add the stock, 
herbs, and vegetable trimmings, simmer very gently 
till tender, from 2 to 2| hours. Place the steak on a 
hot dish. Strain and thicken the gravy with the flour, 
stir till it boils, season it well and pour it over the 
meat. Garnish with vegetables, cut in fancy shapes 
and cooked separately. 

1 lb. beef steak, i onion, i carrot, i turnip, bouquet garni, i oz. 
butter, 1 oz. flour, pint stock or water, salt and pepper 
(Enough for four or five people) 


32 MEAT DISHES 

78. Scotch Collops— Mince the meat. Put the 
butter or dripping into a stewpan and melt it. When 
it is hot put in the meat with the onion finely chopped. 
Stir and beat well with a wooden spoon until brown. 
Add the stock gradually whilst stirring. About 10 
minutes before serving add the bread crumbs. Serve 
with the toast cut into small croutons. 

1 lb. lean juicy beef, x onion, 3 tablespoonfuls bread crumbs, 
1 tablespoonful butter or dripping, £ pint stock, pepper and salt, 
slices of toast. 


79. Boiled Mutton and Broth. — Wipe the meat, 
trim the joint and take off chine bone and any super- 
fluous fat, tie it up, place in boiling water, allow it to 
boil for 5 minutes, carefully removing the scum, then 
allow it to simmer very gently for about i| hours, wash 
and blanch the pearl barley and add, also the vegetables, 
which should be prepared and cut into neat pieces. 
Place the mutton on a hot dish with carrots and turnips 
round, coat with caper or parsley sauce, add seasoning 
and chopped parsley to the broth. 

Neck of mutton (about 3 lb.), 2 carrots, 2 turnips, 1 onion, 2 oz. 
barley or rice, chopped parsley, salt and pepper, caper sauce 
(Enough for seven or eight people ) 


8o-. Mutton Cutlets. — Saw off the chine bone care- 
fully and the end of the bones, allowing 2 inches below 
the eye of the cutlet, divide the cutlets, trim them, 
keeping the bone clean, dip in salt and pepper, then egg 
and bread crumbs, fry in a saut<§pan till a nice brown, 
turning them occasionally, dish in a circle on a border 
of mashed potatoes, fill the centre with peas, sprouts or 


MEAT DISHES 33 

any suitable vegetable, strain a good brown or tomato 
sauce round. 

Best end of neck of mutton, egg and bread crumbs, salt and pepper, 
mashed potatoes, vegetables for garnish, brown or tomato sauce 
( Enough to make six or seven cutlets ) 

81. Roast Shoulder of Mutton. — Take a nice 
shoulder of mutton, 8 lb. ; roast for ij or 2 hours. 
Serve it nice and hot, with brown gravy and onion sauce 
sent to table with it. 

82. Roast Haunch of Mutton. — Take a good 
haunch of mutton which has been well hung. Roast 
it before a clear fire for 2 \ hours, well basting it all the 
time. When nearly done, dredge it over with flour and 
baste it again. Dish up with a good brown gravy which 
should be free from fat. 

83. Roast Saddle of Mutton. — Trim the saddle 
of mutton neatly, then tie it up firmly. Roast it in 
front of a clear fire for two hours, basting it well. When 
done, dish up with brown gravy. Send red currant 
jelly to table with it in a sauceboat. 

84. Mutton Cutlets.— Trim and cut the cutlets 
from the best end of the neck of mutton, then dip them 
into a beaten egg in which is a little grated cheese 
mixed. Egg and bread crumb them, fry them a nice 
golden colour— drain off the fat and dish them up on a 
border of potato. Have ready some plain boiled 
macaroni and some strips of carrot, about equal quan- 
tities ; dish up in the centre of them and serve with 
white sauce around. 

85. Calf’s Feet. — Place the calf’s feet into a stewpan 
with sufficient cold water to cover them. Let them 

c 


34 MEAT DISHES 

come to the boil, then throw away the water. After 
rinsing the feet well put them back into the stewpan 
with enough light stock to cover them, and let them 
simmer for 4 hours. Remove the bones and press the 
feet between two dishes until cold. Cut them into 
small pieces and let them simmer for about 5 minutes. 
Serve with croutons of toast. 

86. Collared Calf’s Head. — Cook the calf’s head. 
Stuff it with veal stuffing in which some ham has been 
chopped. Bone the calf’s head and fill it with stuffing, 
roll it around, tie it up with string, skewer it through 
to keep it firm. Put it into a baking tin, brush it over 
with an egg and cover it with bread crumbs. Put a 
few pieces of butter over the top of it. Place it in the 
oven and let it bake a nice brown (it will take about an 
hour). When done, dish up — serve brown or tomato 
sauce around and little rolls of bacon. 


POULTRY AND GAME 


87. Stewed Pigeon. — Prepare the pigeon as for 
roasting, and sprinkle it with flour. Melt the butter 
in a stewpan, and when boiling put in the pigeon until 
it is quite brown all over, Then take it out and separate 
it from all the grease. Put the stock into the pan, and 
when it is warm replace the pigeon. Put the lid on the 
pan and let the pigeon stew gently for about two hours. 
When tender place it on the toast. Boil up the gravy 
left in the pan quickly and pour it round the pigeon. 
Garnish with either watercress or parsley. 

1 pigeon, £ pint of stock, a small piece of butter, a pinch of flour, 
a slice of toast (small), pepper and salt 

88. Roast Pigeons. — Draw, singe and truss the 
pigeons, lard the breasts, roast in a hot oven, basting 
frequently from twenty to thirty minutes, serve on 
squares of toast with bread sauce and gravy. A plain 
French salad of lettuce dressed with oil and vinegar 
can also be served. 

Pigeons, larding bacon, toast, butter, bread sauce, gravy 

89. Boiled Fowl. — Draw and truss the fowl, taking 
care to loosen the skin of the legs and to push them well 
up inside the body. Put it into hot stock, having first 
wrapped it in buttered paper with 2 slices of lemon on 
the breast. Simmer gently till tender. When cooked 
lift out on to a hot plate, drain and remove string and 
paper, place on a hot dish, coat with bechamel sauce, 
decorate with yolk of egg, put through a sieve and 

35 


36 POULTRY AND GAME 

chopped parsley, garnish the dish with lemon and 
parsley and the cups of white of hard-boiled egg filled 
with vegetables. Serve with boiled ham or bacon. 

i fowl, stock to cover, i pint bechamel sauce, lemon, i hard-boiled 
egg, chopped parsley, salt and pepper, boiled bacon or ham 


90. Chicken Croquettes. — Mince or chop the 
chicken finely, add the chopped ham and parsley, cook 
the flour in the butter, add the white stock and cook till 
it thickens, add to the chicken and ham, season well 
with salt and pepper and a squeeze of lemon juice, place 
on a wet plate, divide into equal portions, set aside to 
cool, form into cork shapes, using a little flour or bread 
crumbs, coat with egg and bread crumbs, fry in hot fat. 
Serve on a hot dish with a fancy paper, garnish with fried 
parsley. 

£ lb. cooked chicken, 2 oz. ham, 1 oz butter, 1 oz. flour, 1 gill white 
stock, 1 teaspoonful chopped parsley, little lemon juice, salt and 
pepper, egg and bread crumbs 

{Enough to make six croquettes ) 


91. Fricassee of Chicken. — Cut the chicken into 
neat joints, place in a stewpan with onion, mace, herbs 
and strip of lemon peel, add the white stock and simmer 
very gently till tender, cook the flour in the butter, 
add the stock the chicken was cooked in and the milk, 
stir till it boils, season well with salt and pepper and 
lemon juice, put back the joints of chicken, serve with 
a rose border of mashed potato, garnish with cut lemon 
and parsley. Cold boiled fowl can be served in this 
way, using the liquor it was boiled in. 

1 chicken, x onion stuffed with cloves, 1 blade of mace, bunch of 
herbs, 1 lemon, 2 oz. butter, 2 oz. flour, £ pint white stock, £ pint 
milk, salt and pepper 

{Enough for six or seven people) 


POULTRY AND GAME 37 

92. Roast Partridge— Pluck, singe and draw the 
birds, truss firmly, making them look plump, roast for 
30 minutes, basting frequently. A slice of fat bacon 
can be tied on the breast to keep them moist ; remove 
it and flour and froth them well a few minutes before 
dishing. Dish on croutons of toast, garnish with water- 
cress, serve with bread sauce and fried bread crumbs 
(see Roast Pheasant). 

1 brace of partridges, a little fat bacon, gravy, bread sauce, water- 
cress, fried crumbs, croutons of toast 

(Enough for three or four people) 

93. Roast Pheasant. — Pluck, singe and draw the 
pheasants, scald and skin the legs, removing the claws, 
wipe with a damp cloth, put a small piece of butter with 
pepper inside, truss for roasting, tie some pieces of fat 
bacon over the breasts, cook for about 1 hour, basting 
frequently, remove the bacon, dredge with flour and 
cook again till brown and frothy. Remove the string, 
place on a hot dish, garnish with watercress. Serve 
with bread sauce, fried bread crumbs and some good 
gravy. 

For the Fried Bread Crumbs . — Melt some butter in 
an enamelled frying-pan, put in some white bread 
crumbs, stir them carefully over the fire until they are 
nicely browned, drain them on paper, place in the 
oven for a few minutes. Serve on a lace paper. 

1 brace of pheasants, fat bacon, little butter, gravy, bread sauce, 
fried bread crumbs, watercress 

94. Roast Grouse. — Pluck, singe and draw the 
grouse, wiping thoroughly with a damp cloth (game 
should never be washed), put a small piece of butter 
with a little pepper and lemon juice inside the birds, 
truss for roasting. A slice of fat bacon and a vine leaf 
or two should be wrapped over the breast of each bird. 


38 POULTRY AND GAME 

Roast in the oven or before the fire, baste frequently, 
remove the bacon and froth just before dishing. Place 
on a hot dish on a crouton of toast, which should be 
made and put under the grouse in the dripping-pan, 
garnish with watercress and serve with bread sauce 
and browned bread crumbs. 

Grouse, butter, fat bacon, gravy, bread sauce, browned bread 
crumbs 

95. Boiled Rabbit. — Skin and cleanse the rabbit, slit 
the thighs so as to be able to draw the legs forward, 
turn the head to the right side, pass a skewer through the 
legs, shoulders and out through the head, keeping the 
rabbit as flat as possible. Boil gently for about 1 hour. 
When tender place on a hot dish, remove the skewers 
and string, coat with parsley sauce, garnish with the 
liver boiled and finely chopped. Onion sauce can be 
used instead of parsley sauce if liked. Serve with boiled 
bacon or pork. 

1 rabbit, 1 pint white sauce, chopped parsley, bacon or pork 
{Enough for four or five people) 

96. Stewed Rabbit. — Skin and wash the rabbit, cut 
into neat joints, melt the butter or dripping in a stew- 
pan, fry the chopped onion a nice brown, remove it, 
dip the rabbit into flour and fry, take out the joints 
and brown the flour, taking care it does not burn, add 
the stock, stir till it boils, put back rabbit, onion, add 
the herbs, simmer gently for three hours, season well, . 
place joints in centre of a hot dish, strain the gravy over. 

1 rabbit, 1 onion, 2 oz. butter or dripping, 2 oz. flour, 1 pint of 
stock, bunch of herbs, salt and pepper 

{Enough for five or six people) 

97. Cr£me of Rabbit.— Take the meat from a rabbit 
and pass it through the mincing machine three or four 


POULTRY AND GAME 39 

times, then add 1 pint of bechamel sauce to it. Mix the 
rabbit well with it, and pass it through a wire sieve ; 
butter a plain mould with a hole in the middle, and 
put in the mixture. Season it nicely and steam for 
20 minutes. When done, turn out immediately or it 
will fall ; serve Hollandaise sauce around. 

98. Quenelles of Rabbit. — Take the meat from a 
rabbit ; soak l lb. bread in water, and wring it through 
a cloth. Put into a saucepan about 2 oz. of butter, a 
bay leaf and a little onion, pepper and salt, and stir 
over the fire for 5 minutes. Pass the meat of the rabbit 
through the mincing machine four or five times, then 
when cold add the yolks of 2 eggs, bread pounded to 
the rabbit, and pass it through a coarse wire sieve, then 
mould the quenelles in a dessert-spoon, shaping them 
nicely in the spoon. Dip a knife in cold water, and 
smooth them nicely, then put them into a sautepan with 
boiling water (about half covering them). Butter a 
paper and put them in the oven for \ hour. When 
done, dish them on a border of potato and pour 
bechamel sauce over them, sprinkling chopped truffles 
over the top, and serve. Quenelles of chicken can be 
done in the same way. 


SOUPS 


99. Pearl Barley Cream Soup. — Simmer the 
barley in the stock with the onion and carrot for 2 hours, 
having previously blanched it ; remove the carrot, stew 
till reduced to a pulp, rub it through a sieve, add enough 
stock or water till it is the consistency of thick cream, 
boil up, allow it to cool and add the yolk of egg beaten 
with a little milk, season and serve with the chopped 
parsley sprinkled on the top. 

1 quart stock, i pint pearl barley, i onion, i carrot, chopped 
parsley, 1 yolk of egg, a little milk, salt and pepper 
( Enough for four or five people) 

100. Mock Turtle Soup (Thick). — Take any re- 
mains of calves’ heads, also the liquor they were boiled 
in, and any odd pieces of cooked meat you may have, 
3 large onions, carrots, celery, a bunch of savoury herbs, 
a teaspoonful of browning, a few peppercorns, 6 cloves, 
and 12 bay leaves, then boil these all together for 2 
hours ; thicken with a good tablespoonful of rue and a 
whole lemon cut in slices. Let it simmer for £ hour 
longer, and then pass it through a sieve ; add to it some 
pieces of calf’s head cut in squares, and forcemeat balls, 
a glass of sherry flavoured with Harvey and Worcester 
sauce, about a teaspoonful of each for 2 or 3 quarts of 
soup. Serve very hot. If liked, these soups can be 
served without wine ; but they are much nicer with it. 

101. Clear Gravy Soup. — ( Foundation of all 
Soups .) — Take 6 lb. of shin of beef ; cut off the meat 
from the bone, chop the bone and put it into the stock 

40 


SOUPS 41 

pot ; cut up the meat fine, and add 4 quarts of cold 
water, a little browning, a little salt, a few peppercorns, 
about half-a-dozen cloves, a bunch of savoury herbs 
and 6 bay leaves, a tablespoonful of vinegar and a few 
egg-shells. Bring it to the boil on a slow fire, and let it 
simmer slowly for 3 hours, then skim off some of the 
fat from the top ; add 3 onions, a carrot or two, a good 
handful of celery, and let it simmer for another 3 hours. 
Strain it and free it from fat, then it will be ready for use, 

102. Oyster Soup. — 3 oz. of butter, 3 oz. of flour, 1^ 
pints of new milk, 1 pint of white stock, and 2 doz. 
sauce oysters. Blanch the oysters, saving the liquor, 
stir the butter and flour over the fire until it is well 
baked, then add the liquor that the oysters were 
blanched in ; add the milk gradually, bring it to the 
boil, add 2 bay leaves, a pinch of cayenne pepper, a tea- 
spoonful of anchovy ; cut the oysters in halves, put 
them in the soup tureen and strain the soup over them, 
and serve. 

103. Mutton Broth.— A sheep’s head, 3 lb. of scrag 
end of neck of mutton. Put them in a gallon of water 
with a teaspoonful of pearl barley, and boil for 1 hour ; 
cut up about 1 lb. of vegetables into small dice (viz. 
cairots, onions, parsnips, celery and turnips). Let 
them boil for 1 hour, seasoned with pepper and salt. 
Skim off all the fat and chop up a good heaped-up 
tablespoonful of parsley and put into the soup. Let it 
stand for 5 minutes, take out the mutton and cut it up 
in neat pieces, put it into the soup tureen and pour the 
mutton broth over, and serve. 

104. Mutton Broth.— About 1 lb. of the scrag end of 
the neck of mutton, 1 dessertspoonful of pearl barley, a 


42 SOUPS 

little salt, i carrot, a small piece of parsley and a quart 
of water. Boil this in a clean enamel saucepan for 
3 hours. 

105. Veal Broth. — 1 lb. of knuckle of veal, 1 pint of 
water, a saltspoonful of salt, a little parsley and thyme, 
1 bay leaf, and put in a teaspoonful of fine sago. Cover 
down, and cook for three hours. 

106. Scotch Broth. — Cut meat up finely, removing 
fat and skin, chop the bones, add to the water with 
onion seasoning and bouquet garni, allow to simmer 
gently for 1 hour, strain and remove bones, return to the 
saucepan with the blanched barley, carrot and turnip 
cut in tiny dice, simmer till carrot is tender, put back 
some of the meat cut in neat pieces, season and add 
parsley just before serving. 

2 lb. neck mutton, 1 quart of water, 1 onion, 1 carrot, 1 turnip, 2 oz. 
pearl barley, bouquet garni, seasoning, 1 teaspoonful chopped parsley 
[Enough for four people) 


107. Vermicelli Soup. — Take some clear soup as 
in No. 1. Take about 1 oz. of vermicelli, 1 quart of 
soup, 1 bay leaf, and 1 onion. Put the soup into a 
stewpan and add the vermicelli, bring it to the boil, and 
let it boil gently for about 10 minutes. Serve hot. 

108. Quickly-made Clear Soup.— Cut some shreds 
of carrot, celery and onions ; boil them in a quart of 
water, with a bunch of savoury herbs (should take 
about 10 minutes). When done, add 1 teaspoonful of 
Liebig’s Extract of Beef, 1 of tarragon vinegar, 1 lump 
of sugar, a little Harvey sauce, salt to taste, and 2 sheets 
of white-leaf gelatine. When stock is not at hand, this 
makes a very nice plain soup. 


SOUPS 43 

109. Tomato Soup. — 6 tomatoes, 3 large potatoes, 
4 large onions, 2 quarts of stock from the second stock 
of No. 1, a little salt, a slice of ham or bacon. Slice 
the tomatoes, and peel and slice the onions and pota- 
toes ; put them into a saucepan with a bunch of savoury 
herbs, boil them for 1 hour, and pass them through a 
sieve. Put the puree into a saucepan and place it on the 
stove ; bring it to the boil, stirring all the time, then 
put a good teaspoonful of cornflour into a teacup, and 
mix it ; add to it § pint of new milk and stir it into the 
soup. This makes it equal to cream. Serve with fried 
bread. 

no. Pur£e of Vegetable Marrow. — Peel a nice- 
sized vegetable marrow, cut it up and free it from seeds, 
then wash it in clean water, put it into a stewpan with 
2 onions, 3 or 4 bay leaves, salt and pepper, and 3 oz. 
of butter, 1 quart of white stock or water ; let it simmer 
for an hour, then pass the puree through a fine sieve and 
add if pints of new milk. Stir it over the fire until it 
boils, mix a dessertspoonful of cornflour with a little 
milk, let it boil, and serve with fried crusts of bread. 
This is sufficient for six or eight people. 

in. Scotci-i Broth. — Cut meat up finely, removing 
fat and skin, chop the bones, add to the water with 
onion seasoning and bouquet garni, allow to simmer 
gently for 1 hour, strain and remove bones, return to 
the saucepan with the blanched barley, carrot and 
turnip cut in tiny dice, simmer till carrot is tender, put 
back some of the meat cut in neat pieces, season and 
add parsley just before serving. 

2 lb. neck mutton, i quart of water, i onion, i carrot, i turnip, 
2 oz. pearl barley, bouquet garni, seasoning, i teaspoonful chopped 
parsley 

( Enough for four people) 


44 SOUPS 

112. Lentil Soup. — Wash the lentils and soak for 
12 hours with a little carbonate of soda in the water. 
Cut the vegetables into small pieces, put the dripping 
into the pan with them and cook for 5 minutes with the 
lid on. Add the lentils, water and flavourings, boil 
gently till reduced to a pulp, pass through a sieve, 
season and serve with small squares of toast or crohtons 
of fried bread. 

£ pint lentils, i quart water, 3 onions, 2 small carrots, 1 small 
turnip, 1 oz. dripping, 2 potatoes, bunch of herbs, salt and pepper 
[Enough for four people) 

113. Pea Soup. — Soak the peas for 12 hours with a 
pinch of carbonate of soda added to the water, put them 
in a saucepan with the water and vegetables, cut up in 
small pieces, simmer for 2 or 3 hours till tender, pass 
through a sieve, season and serve with crofttons of toast 
or fried bread. 

1 quart water, \ pint split peas, 1 onion, small piece of carrot, small 
piece turnip, stick of celery, salt and pepper 


1 14. Haricot Soup. — Soak the beans for 12 hours in 
cold water with a pinch of carbonate of soda, melt the 
dripping in a saucepan, add onion and beans, cook for 
5 minutes with the lid on, add the water and simmer for 
3 or 4 hours until the beans are tender. Pass through a 
sieve, add the milk, season well, reheat, serve with 
croutons of fried bread. 

i£ pints water, £ pint milk, £ pint haricot beans, i onion, £ oz. 
dripping, salt and pepper 

[Enough for four people) 


115. Onion Soup. — Peel and cut up the onions. 
Put into a saucepan with the dripping and cook for 
5 minutes with the lid on. Add the water and salt. 
Boil until the onion is quite tender, mix the flour 


SOUPS 45 

smoothly with the milk, add to the soup and boil well. 
Season to taste and serve. 

3 Spanish onions, 2 small onions, x oz. dripping, 2J oz. flour, 
2j pints water, £ pint milk, salt, pepper 

(Enough for four or five people) 

116. Potato Soup. — Peel and cut the potatoes into 
slices, chop the onions, melt the fat in a saucepan, add 
potatoes and onions and cook for 5 minutes with the lid 
on ; add the water and boil gently till reduced to a 
pulp ; add the washed sago and the milk. Cook till the 
sago is transparent. Season and serve. 

1 lb. potatoes, 2 onions, 1 pint water, \ pint milk, 1 oz. fat, £ oz. 
sago, salt and pepper 

(Enough for three people ) 

1 17. Brown Vegetable Soup. — Melt the dipping in 
a stewpan, prepare and chop the vegetables and brown 
them carefully in the fat, remove them, add the flour 
to the fat and brown it, taking care it does not burn ; 
add the water gradually, stir till it boils, return the 
vegetables and the herbs to the stewpan and simmer 
gently for an hour, strain, season well and serve with 
squares of toast. 

1 quart water, 1 carrot, 1 turnip, 1 onion, 1 stick of celery, bunch 
of herbs, 1 oz. flour, 1 oz. dripping or butter, salt and pepper 
(Enough for four people) 


SWEETS AND PUDDINGS 


118. Rice Mould. — Wash the rice, allow it to soak 
in the milk for some time, put into a saucepan and cook 
till tender and the milk is taken up, add the sugar and 
flavouring, pour into a wet mould, turn out when cold 
and serve with stewed fruit or jam. 

3 oz. rice, i pint milk, 2 oz. sugar, flavouring 
( Enough for three or four people) 

1 19. Rice Croquettes. — Put the rice on in a sauce- 
pan to cook with the milk and flavouring. When 
tender and all the milk absorbed add the sugar, turn on 
to a wet plate, divide into equal portions and set aside 
to cool. When firm roll into balls, using a few crumbs, 
coat with egg and crumbs, fry a golden brown in hot 
fat, drain well, put a small strip of angelica into each 
to look like a stem, serve on a hot dish with lace paper 
with jam or jam sauce. 

4 oz. rice, 1 pint milk, 1 oz. Sugar, flavouring, egg and bread 
crumbs, angelica 

(Enough to make eight or ten croquettes) 

120. Milky Rice Pudding. — A heaped-up table- 
spoonful of rice, a dessert ditto of sugar, and a pint of 
milk. Place in dish with a little butter and a little 
mixed spice. Bake in a slow oven for i| hours. 

121. Semolina Pudding. — 2 tablespoonfuls of 
semolina, 1 of sugar, and a pint of milk. Stir over a 
fire until boiling, then beat in 1 egg. Place in a buttered 
dish and bake for \ hour. This can also be steamed, 
but would then require 2 eggs. Time, 1 hour. 

46 


SWEETS AND PUDDINGS 47 

122. Blancmange. — 1 tablespoonful of cornflour, 1 
pint of milk, and 1 tablespoonful of sugar. Put the corn- 
flour in a stewpan with 2 laurel leaves, and add the 
sugar and milk. Stir over a slow fire until boiling. 
Let it boil for 5 minutes, stirring continually. This can 
be coloured pink and white, and is very nice served with 
stewed fruit. 


123. Roly-Poly Jam Pudding. — Make a suet crust. 
Roll out thinly and spread over with any jam. Roll 
into a pudding cloth, which should be floured. Boil 
i\ hours. 

124. Lemon Cream. — 1 pint of milk, the rind of 
2 lemons, the juice of 1, the yolks of 3 eggs, 1 table- 
spoonful of sugar and 2 oz. of gelatine. Stir until it 
thickens, over a fire. When nearly boiling, stir in the 
gelatine (which should have been soaked). When 
nearly cold, add the juice of 1 lemon and \ pint of 
whipped cream. Stir all together into a mould. Let 
it set. 

N.B. Orange Cream is made in the same way 
substituting oranges for lemons. 

125. Sweet Omelet.— Separate the whites and yolks 
of eggs, beat the whites to a stiff froth with the tea- 
spoonful of sugar, mix lightly with the well-beaten 
yolks, melt the butter in an omelet pan, pour in the 
eggs, stir quickly till the mixture begins to set, put the 
omelet pan in the oven for a minute or two to brown 
slightly. Shape the omelet, put the warmed jam in 

the centre, fold over and turn on to a hot dish and serve 
immediately. 

3 eggs, little jam, £ oz. butter, i teaspoonful castor sugar 

126. Stewed PEARs.-Peel the pears, cut them in 


48 SWEETS AND PUDDINGS 

half, take out the core, put them in a stewing jar with 
the water, sugar, lemon rind and spices, add the claret 
and some drops of carmine, cover with the peelings and 
stew gently in the oven for 3 or 4 hours. When cool 
put into a glass dish and pour the syrup over. 

2 lb. pears, 6 oz. sugar, i pint water, little claret, 4 cloves, 1 inch 
cinnamon, strip of lemon peel, carmine colouring 
(. Enough for six or seven people) 

127. Apple Snow. — Peel, core and slice the apples, 
stew them with the sugar, dissolve the gelatine in the 
water and add with the grated rind and juice of lemon. 
Whip the whites to a stiff froth and stir in lightly. Put 
into a mould. Turn out when set and serve with 
custard sauce. 

£ lb. apples, £ oz. gelatine, 4 oz. castor sugar, £ gill water, rind of 
1 lemon, juice of \ lemon, whites of 2 eggs, custard sauce 
{Enough for four or five people) 

128. Boiled Custard. — i egg, i teacupful of milk, 
1 dessertspoonful of sugar, and a little flavouring. 
Whisk all together and stir over the fire until it thickens 
(it must not boil or it will be spoilt). When done, pour 
it into custard cups or small jug. Let it stand till cold. 

129. Rice Pudding. — i pint milk, 2 tablespoons 
rice, 1 tablespoon sugar, a good pinch of salt, a little 
butter. Grease the dish ; wash the rice and put it into 
the dish with the sugar, salt and butter ; pour on the 
milk, grate a little nutmeg on the top, and bake in a 
very slow oven for 2 hours. Serve cold, and it is better 
the day after it is baked. 

130. Sago Pudding. — 2 oz. sago, 1 oz. sugar, 

1 pint milk, 1 egg. Boil the milk, sprinkle in the sago, 
stir until it boils, then simmer gently until the sago 
becomes transparent. Add the sugar, cool slightly, 


SWEETS AND PUDDINGS 49 

then beat the egg and stir it into the mixture. Pour into 
a greased pie-dish, grate a little nutmeg on the top, and 
bake gently for 25 or 30 minutes. 

131. Arrowroot Pudding. — Mix the arrowroot 
smoothly with a little of the cold milk, put the rest of 
the milk into a saucepan and when boiling pour it on 
the arrowroot. Return to the saucepan and cook for 
3 minutes, stirring all the time. Turn it into a basin, 
let it cool, add sugar and the yolk of the egg and the 
white beaten to a stiff froth. Stir lightly and pour into 
a buttered pie-dish and bake for about ro minutes. It 
must not boil. 

1 dessertspoonful arrowroot, | pint milk, i egg, sugar, flavouring 

132. Ginger Pudding.— \ lb. of flour, 6 oz. of .suet 
chopped fine, 1 egg, 1 teaspoonful of ground ginger, 2 
tablespoonfuls of golden syrup, 1 gill of milk. Warm 
the milk, then add the syrup and the egg. Beat a little, 
then mix in the other ingredients. Steam for 2 hours 
in a well-buttered basin. Turn out and serve with 
sweet sauce. 


I 33- Treacle Pudding. — Make a suet crust, line a 
pudding basin thinly, then put in a tablespoonful of 
treacle, and a layer of paste, then another of treacle 
and paste, and so on until the basin is full. Cover over 
the top and tie down with a pudding cloth. Steam for 
3 hours. 

134. Snowballs and Custard.— Take 3 yolks of 
eggs, separated from the whites. Bring a pint of milk 
to the boil. Whip the whites to a stiff froth — and add 
gradually a dessertspoonful of castor sugar and a little 
essence of lemon. Take the mixture and place by 
spoonfuls into the milk. Allow it to simmer for 10 


50 SWEETS AND PUDDINGS 

minutes, but not to boil. Whip the yolks and add the 
milk with a dessertspoonful of sugar. Place in the pan 
and stir it over the fire until thick. When nearly cold, 
place the snowballs in the custard. 

135. Glazed Apples. — Peel and core 6 large apples. 
Cook without breaking. Add before cooking 1 table- 
spoonful of sugar, 1 teacupful of water, the rind of a 
lemon, and simmer until done. Add a few drops of 
carmine and let the apples stand in it. Lift carefully 
out on a dish. Take a teaspoonful of cornflour and stir 
into the syrup, until it is like glaze. Arrange the apples 
on a dish (not on a glass one) and pour over the glaze. 
Serve hot or cold. 

136. Lady Betty Pudding. — Line a plain charlotte 
mould with bread cut in strips, the length of the mould. 
Cut a round piece of bread \ inch thick (the size of the 
top). Take some fruit, as damsons, plums, black- 
berries, etc., and stew 1 lb. with \ lb. of sugar. Pour 
in the mould. Place the bread on the top. Put a 
plate on and stand till the next day. Turn it out, pour 
custard around it, and serve. 

137. Lemon Sponge. — Peel the lemons thinly and 
put into a saucepan with lemon juice, sugar and gela- 
tine, boil gently for 15 minutes. Allow to get cool, 
beat up the whites very stiffly, add the gelatine and 
water, etc., whisk well till it begins to stiffen, pour into a 
wet mould and turn out when set. 

1 pint water, i oz. gelatine, \ lb. loaf sugar, rind and juice of 

3 lemons, 3 whites of eggs 

{Enough for five or six people) 

138. Prune Mould. — Soak the prunes in i pint of 
water, then put them in a stewpan in the same liquid 


SWEETS AND PUDDINGS 51 

with sugar, lemon rind, and cook till tender. Remove 
the stones, rub through a sieve, add the dissolved gela- 
tine, claret, colour with carmine, pour into a wet mould, 
turn out when set and serve in a glass dish. 

1 lb. prunes, i pint water, 3 oz. sugar, 1 oz. gelatine, rind and juice 
of 1 lemon, 1 wineglass claret, carmine to colour 

( Enough for five or six people) 

139. Lemon Sago. — Boil the sago with the water till 
quite clear, add the syrup and lemon rind and juice, 
boil all together for a few minutes and pour into a wet 
mould. Turn out when set and serve with custard 
sauce. 

4 oz. sago, 1 pint water, 4 tablespoonfuls golden syrup, grated rind 
and juice of 2 lemons, custard sauce 

( Enough for five or six people ) 

140. Canary Pudding. — Cream the butter and sugar 
together, add the sifted flour and eggs alternately, beat- 
ing well, add the grated lemon rind and lastly the baking 
powder. Put mixture into a well-greased mould, steam 
for 1 J hours. Serve with lemon sauce. 

2 eggs, their weight in butter, sugar, flour, grated rind of 2 lemons, 
\ teaspoonful baking powder, pinch of salt 

[Enough for five or six people ) 

141. Apple Dumplings. — Make the pastry with flour 
and butter and lard, add pinch of salt, mix stiffly with 
water, cut into as many pieces as apples, allowing 
roughly 1 oz. of pastry to each apple, peel and core the 
apples, keeping them whole, place each on a piece of 
pastry, fill the hole with sugar and a clove, work 
the pastry round the apple, brush over with water, 
sprinkle with sugar, bake till the apple is cooked — about 
20 minutes. 

6 or or 8 apples, 8 oz. flour, 4 oz. lard and butter, pinch of salt, 6 or 
8 cloves, sugar, water 

( Enough for six or eight people) 


52 SWEETS AND PUDDINGS 

142. Apple Pudding. — Make a suet crust with £ lb. 
of flour and 4 oz. of beef suet and a little salt. Slice 
the suet in thin slices and roll it well into the flour. 
Mix with a little water, then fold and roll it thin. 
Butter a basin and line it with the paste. Peel and 
core 1 lb. of nice apples and slice them in thin slices and 
fill the basin. Add a tablespoonful of sugar, a little 
lemon rind, and a tablespoonful of water ; cover the 
top with paste, tie down with a cloth, and boil 3 hours. 
When cooked, turn out, and serve with cream or custard, 
or plain. 

N.B . — All kinds of fruit puddings are similarly made. 

143. Apple Souffle.— Take 3 large apples (peel 
and core them), 2 tablespoonfuls of ground rice, £ pint 
of milk, the yolks and whites of 2 eggs, and 1 full table- 
spoonful of sugar, with a little lemon rind. Place the 
ground, rice with 1 oz. of butter and £ pint of milk in 
the saucepan, stir over a fire until boiling, then add the 
apple, which should be well stewed ; next beat in the 
yolks of 2 eggs. Whip the whites to a stiff fioth and 
add to the souffle. Butter a souffle dish and put a 
band of paper round ; put in the mixture and bake in 
a moderate oven for 20 or 30 minutes. 

144. Apple Charlotte. — Peel and core 2 lb. of 
apples ; £ lb. of sugar, the rind of a lemon, and a little 
mixed spice. Stew the apples over a fire, stirring con- 
tinually. Line a mould with bread and butter £ inch 
thick, the buttered side against the mould, and a round 
of bread and butter at the bottom. A tablespoonful of 
bread crumbs must be mixed, with the apple ; place in 
the mould, bake 1 hour. Turn out and serve with 
marmalade sauce. 


SWEETS AND PUDDINGS 53 

Two tablespoonfuls of marmalade and one of water. 
Boil together and put lightly over the charlotte. 

145. Bread and Butter Pudding. — Cut some 
slices of bread and butter and fill a dish neatly with it. 
Place with it a good handful of cleaned currants. Mix 
2 eggs into 1 pint of milk with 1 tablespoonful of sugar ; 
pour this over the bread and butter and bake for an 
hour. 

146. Omelet Souffle. — An egg should be allowed 
for each person. A nice little one can be made with 
three eggs. Separate the whites from the yolks, stir 
into the three yolks a teaspoonful of flour, a table- 
spoonful of castor sugar, a little essence of lemon and 
a tablespoonful of milk. Stir these well together, whip 
the whites, add lightly to the other ingredients. This 
can be either baked in the oven or fried. If baked, it 
must be sent to table in the dish it is baked in. If 
fried, turn out and serve. 

147. Baked Custard. — 1 egg, 1 teaspoonful of 
flour, \ pint of milk, a little flavouring and 1 dessert- 
spoonful of sugar. Whisk well together, put it into a 
pie-dish, bake 20 minutes. Take | lb. of green goose- 
berries, 1 tablespoonful of sugar and 1 of water. 
Cook for 10 minutes. When cold, put in glass dish and 
serve with the custard. 


VEGETABLES 


148. Potato Souffles. — Make a nice mashed potato, 
adding the yolk and white of an egg, and about 1 oz. 
of butter. Mix in the butter, the yolk of egg, and a 
little salt and pepper. Whip in the white, mix into the 
souffle. Butter some little souffle cases and fill them 
with this. Bake in a quick oven for 20 minutes. If 
liked, this can be served in a souffle dish. 

149. New Potatoes. — Scrape the potatoes gently, 
putting them at once into cold water. Put them into 
a saucepan of boiling water with the salt and mint, cook 
gently from 20 to 30 minutes. Drain off the v r ater, 
add the butter, shake gently to coat them, turn into a 
hot vegetable dish and sprinkle over some finely- 
chopped parsley. 

2 lb. new potatoes, sprig of mint, salt, 1 oz. butter, chopped 
parsley, boiling water 

150. Old Potatoes. — Peel the potatoes thinly, put 
them in a saucepan with cold water, add the salt, cook 
very gently with the lid on till tender, test with a 
skewer. Pour off the water, put them back on the stove 
with the lid half on the pan to dry, place a folded clean 
cloth over them. Dish in a hot vegetable dish. 

2 lb. potatoes, salt, cold water 

151. Cauliflower. — Wash the cauliflower. Let it 
stand a little while in salt and water. Put it into boiling 
water containing a little salt and a little soda. Let it 
boil 20 minutes. When done, drain it on a sieve for a 
minute or tw'o ; then dish up and pour a little butter 
over It can also be served with white sauce. 

54 


VEGETABLES 55 

152. Asparagus. — Wash and scrape the white part 
of the asparagus, tie in bundles with tape, cut the stalks 
an even length. Put them in a saucepan of boiling 
water (stand the bundles up if possible) with salt and a 
pinch of carbonate of soda, boil very gently for about 
20 to 30 minutes, taking care not to break the heads. 
Lift out the bundles, drain, untie them and place on a 
slice of toast in a hot vegetable dish. Serve the butter 
melted in a tureen. Hollandaise sauce is sometimes 
served. 

Asparagus, toast, butter, salt and soda 

153. Haricot Beans. — One pint of beans ; soak 
Overnight, boil until tender. Have ready some butter, 
and parsley chopped, and the juice of a lemon, pepper, 
salt, and a tiny dust of mixed spice. Stir over the fire 
for a few minutes and serve. This makes a nice winter 
dish. 

154. Brussels Sprouts. — Take off the outside leaves 
of the sprouts and cut across the stalk, leave to soak in 
salted water. Place them in boiling water with salt 
and a pinch of carbonate of soda and cook gently 
uncovered till tender, drain well in a colander, arrange 
neatly in a hot vegetable dish. 

Sprouts, salt, carbonate of soda 


i 55 - Boiled Onions. — Skin the onions, put them into 
boiling water with salt and cook for 2 or 3 hours, accord- 
ing to the size. Drain them, place them in a hot dish 
and pour the white sauce over and serve. Another 
method is to put about 1 oz. of butter in the pan when 
the water is poured off, allow it to get quite hot, season 
with salt and pepper and serve in a hot vegetable dish, 
Spanish onions, salt, £ pint white sauce 


56 VEGETABLES 

156. Seakale. Put the kale in nice bundles. Trim 
it and wash it. Put it in boiling water with no salt, 
as it turns it dark. Boil 20 or 30 minutes. Dish up 
on toast. Pour white sauce over and serve. 

15 7 - Braised Celery. — Clean the celery nicely by 
scrubbing it with a brush. Cut in half. Tie it up in 
bundles. Put it in a stewpan with 1 bay leaf, salt, and 
a little Worcester sauce. Cook about 2 hours. Make 
a nice brown gravy with some of the liquor it was cooked 
in. Dish up. Remove the string; pour the sauce 
over. Serve. 

158. Boiled Leeks.— Wash the leeks thoroughly, 
trim into even lengths, tie them into bundles, put them 
into boiling water with salt and boil till quite tender, 
drain them, dish on a slice of toast in a hot vegetable 
dish, remove the tape, pour the white sauce over and 
serve. 

Leeks, salt, £ pint white sauce, toast 

159. Turnips A la Cr£me.— Peel, wash, and boil the 
turnips after they have been cut in slices about \ inch 
thick. When nicely cooked, take them out carefully, 
and make a nice white sauce with 1 gill of new milk and 
1 teaspoonful of cornflour ; add a little salt and pepper ; 
put the milk on to boil, then mix the cornflour with a 
little cold milk, and stir into the hot milk. Add a piece 
of butter or a little cream. Dish the slices of turnip 
on the dish nicely, pour the sauce over, and serve. 

160. Mashed Turnips. — Peel, wash, and cut the 
turnips in halves, cook them for about 1 hour, then 
strain them and squeeze out all the water. Add a little 
cream or butter, pepper and salt ; mash them nicely, 
sent to table nice and hot. 


VEGETABLES 57 

161. Peas. — Make the water boil ; add to it a little 
soda (about the size of a pea), a lump of sugar, a 
little salt, and a little green mint. Boil for io or 15 
minutes. Strain the peas. Put them into a covered 
dish to keep them green. 

162. Scarlet Runners or French Beans. — Cut 
them nicely, put them in boiling water with a little salt 
and \ a saltspoonful of bicarbonate of soda. Let them 
boil until done, then strain them on a sieve, and put on 
a little butter. Serve. 

163. Spinach. — Pick the spinach over and remove 
the stalks and mid-ribs of the leaves, wash thoroughly 
in several waters to remove the grit, put in a saucepan 
with no water except that which adheres to the leaves, 
add a little salt and pinch of carbonate of soda, stir 
occasionally. When tender drain it and pass it through 
a sieve, return to the pan, add a little butter or cream, 
season it, dish in a pyramid shape in a hot vegetable 
dish, garnish with quarters of hard-boiled egg and 
triangles of fried bread. 

Spinach, salt, soda, butter, hard-boiled egg, croiltons of fried bread, 
salt and pepper 

164. Stewed Celery.— Well wash and trim the 
celery, split each head into four lengthways, tie firmly 
into bundles, cut in equal lengths, place in a stewpan 
with enough boiling water to cover and a little salt. 
Boil till tender (about an hour) , drain it carefully, dish 
in a hot vegetable dish on a slice of toast and pour the 
white sauce over. Celery can also be boiled in a nice 
brown stock and a sauce to coat it made of 1 oz. butter, 
1 oz. flour (browned), and \ pint of the stock the celery 
was boiled in. Seasoned and served in the same way. 

3 or 4 heads celery, salt, £ pint white sauce, toast 


EXTRA RECIPES 

165. Gruel. Mix a tablespoonful of Patent groats 
with 2 tablespoonfuls of water. When it is quite a 
smooth paste add 1 pint of boiling water or milk, stir 
well and boil for 10 minutes. Add sugar to taste. 

166. Gruel. — Mix the groats smoothly with a little 
of the cold milk, put the rest of the milk on to boil- 
When boiling pour on to the groats, return to the sauce- 
pan and cook well, stirring all the time. Add a pinch 
of salt and strain into a breakfast cup. Sugar can be 
added if liked, and it can be made with half or all water 
if preferred. 

1 dessertspoonful Robinson’s patent groats, i pint milk, salt 

167. Gruel for Colds.— Mix a tablespoonful of fine 
oatmeal with a little water, pour it into 1 pint of boiling 
water and boil for 5 minutes, stirring all the time. 
Milk may be used instead of water if preferred. 

(See also under Arrowroot, Gruel and Barley Gruel.) 

168. Bread Sauce. — Boil the milk with the onion 
stuck with the cloves and the mace, rub the bread 
crumbs through a wire sieve, pour the seasoned milk 
over them, return to the saucepan and cook well, add 
the butter, salt and pepper and the cream just before 
serving. Served with roast game and poultry. 

1 pint milk, 4 oz. bread crumbs, 2 oz. butter, blade of mace, 1 onion, 

2 cloves, 2 tablespoonfuls cream, salt and pepper 

169. Gravy for Roast Joint. — When the joint is 
roasted place it on a hot dish in the oven, pour off all 

58 


EXTRA RECIPES 59 

the fat, leaving the sediment, which is the gravy from 
the meat, sprinkle a little salt in the pan, add some 
water, or if preferred well-flavoured stock, a little bovril 
or colouring if necessary, boil up, stirring well all round 
the pan, dissolving all the brown particles, strain round 
the meat. 


SWEET SAUCES 

170. Treacle Sauce— Put all together in a sauce- 
pan and boil for 5 minutes. 

2 tablespoonfuls treacle or golden syrup, i gill water, lemon juice 

171. Marmalade Sauce.— Boil together for 5 minutes 
and strain. 

2 tablespoonfuls marmalade, i gill water, lemon juice, i dessert- 
poonful sugar 

172. Sweet Pudding Sauce. — Melt the butter, add 
the flour and cook it for a minute, stir in the milk and 
boil gently for 5 minutes. Any flavouring can then be 
added, such as vanilla, lemon or almond essence, brandy 
or sherry. 

1 oz. butter, A oz. flour, A pint milk, A oz. castor sugar, any flavouring 

173. Custard Sauce No. i. — Mix the cornflour with 
a little of the milk, put the rest on to boil. When boil- 
ing stir in the cornflour and cook for 3 minutes, add 
the sugar. When a little cool add the beaten egg, stir 
till it thickens — but it must not boil again, add flavour- 
ing if required. 

\ pint milk, 1 egg, A oz. cornflour, A oz. sugar 

174. Custard Sauce No. 2. — Cook in a double 
saucepan until the custard thickens — it must not boil, 
add sugar and flavouring. 

3 or 4 yolks of eggs, A pint milk, A oz. sugar, flavouring 


6o 


EXTRA RECIPES 


DRINKS 


175. Mint Tea. — Place some young shoots of mint 
into an earthen bowl, and pour some boiling water on 
them. Put a cover over this and set it near the fire 
for about 1 hour. This is a wonderful cure for allaying 
nausea and vomiting. 

176. Toast Water. — Toast the slice of bread very 
slowly until brown and dry, but without burning it. 
Let it get cold, put it in a jug, pour the boiling water 
over, cover and let it stand till cold, strain before serv- 
ing. 

1 large slice of bread, 1 pint boiling water 

177. Black Currant Tea. — Put the jam into a jug, 
add the lemon juice, pour over the boiling water, cover 
for a few minutes, strain it and serve. 

1 tablespoonfiil black currant jam, little lemon juice, £ pint boiling 
water 

178. Linseed Tea. — Wash the linseed, put it into a 
saucepan with the cold water, simmer for \ hour, add 
liquorice and sugar-candy, strain before using. 

£ oz. linseed, 1 pint water, J oz. liquorice, £ oz - sugar-candy 

179. Cure for Sore Throat. — Half a wineglassful 
of port wine, § teaspoonful of chili vinegar, 1 teaspoon- 
ful of honey. 

180. Another Remedy. — 1 tablespoonful of jam 
or jelly, black currant ; boil for 5 minutes in \ tumbler- 
ful of water, strain. Ready for use. 

181. Apple- Water Drink. — 1 pint of boiling 
water poured on to a tart apple well baked and mashed ; 
then beaten up, cooled and^^jG^iH^akes a perfect 
drink for feverish patients 


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